Outreach

OutreachEducation is our primary focus. We work to improve awareness about the needs of parrots around the world including those in captivity, in retail situations, in the wholesale and retail pet trades, in breeding situations, in rescue, sanctuary and welfare organizations, and awareness of and about the birds in their indigenous locations.

We have developed a series of educational classes, materials and lectures covering varied topics of bird care for the interested parrot enthusiast and potential adopter. With its national volunteer liaisons, a broader audience can be reached with this important educational network.

Outreach or Event Request


The Foundation educates through a variety of mediums:

Informational Programs and the Disbursement of Educational Materials

We conduct informational programs and provide educational materials to the public — including many retail stores and bird clubs, veterinary practices, bird marts, shows and conferences — through aviary tours, original and reproduced printed educational packets, data compilations, newsletters, website information, written and email correspondence, publications and journals, and telephone support and counseling.

Staff and birds often appear at related animal awareness events, make public appearances at venues such as Rotary Club meetings, senior care facilities, or upon request to appear from other organizations. Our off-site volunteer liaisons assist nationally with similar types of appearances providing educational literature, informational support, and hands-on interaction with birds.

Authorship of Articles and Booklets

Our staff writes articles and booklets concerning bird welfare. Many informative articles appear in our newsletter, “The Front Perch™” and throughout our website.

Our Education Packet includes the booklet, “How to Care for your Companion Bird”, and sells to breeders, hobbyists and other interested persons, such as veterinary practitioners, to help educate the public about total bird welfare. The brochure, Establishing a Parrot Welfare Organization”, provides substantial examination of this topic with information on establishing an operating parrot welfare program/facility and includes basic, non-legal information about becoming a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization.

The Foundation also provides information to interested individuals about how to provide for their parrot’s future when they can no longer physically provide for them in its two brochures, “ A Lasting Tribute to a Lifetime of Love”, and “Providing for your Companion Parrot”.

Lectures

Our staff or volunteer liaisons generally lecture on bird care and related issues at least twice a month, often off-premises. This includes numerous school visitors onsite and at the educational facility, providing tremendous resource information to children of all ages, veterinary technicians and interns, pre-veterinary and veterinary students, as well as to other animal welfare organizations, hobbyists, breeders and newly interested persons, potential adopters and those who are simply curious.

Symposiums and Conferences

We often participate in and attend national and international conferences, and maintain affiliations with organizations which focus on parrots and related animal welfare, husbandry, education or veterinary topics. National Continuing Education credits are offered at most of the Foundation’s symposium and conference events. In the past we’ve held other educational programs, fundraisers and benefits such as the Psummer Psittacine Pscelebration, Art Affair Extraordinaire, Kids ‘n Kritters, and Parrots in Paradise that underscore the parrot welfare cause. Volunteer liaisons hold local promotional and educational events to provide this information on a national level.

Many national bird clubs request permission to use our material in their newsletters and provide copies of our educational material to their members at large. Founder Julie Murad, and/or other Foundation staff are frequently requested to present at avicultural venues, pet store and bird club events.

Coordination with Educational Facilities

We work with local, regional and national school districts, community colleges, veterinary technician programs and university veterinary programs. For example, our staff has participated in the avian care segment of the exotics program to the highly regarded certified veterinary technician programs at Colorado Mountain College, and the Bel-Ray Technical Institute, as well as to other national accredited animal technician programs.

We have presented bi-annually to the Colorado Association of Animal Control Officers and to other interested humane organizations. Julie Murad has presented at the annual conferences of the Association of Avian Veterinarians and to many veterinary school programs nationwide, with an avian and exotics program on non-medical issues often overlooked in medical practices.

Internship Programs

The Gabriel Foundation hosts on-site extended internship programs for college students, veterinary technicians, and pre-veterinary and veterinary students. Many persons interested in starting their own parrot care organization, parrot pet-sitting business or adoption/rehabilitation program are frequent visitors and interns to the our aviary and facilities.

Volunteer Activities

We welcome interested public, rescue, sanctuary, welfare organizations, veterinarians and members to participate in hands-on care of the aviary and the birds! The Foundation willingly provides its materials to interested volunteers to distribute appropriately in their local area. We developed a volunteer training program for training, teaching, educational and safety purposes. Our organization hosts family fun, on-site volunteer work weekends and picnic lunches at the aviary throughout the year.

Networking

The Gabriel Foundation developed the Veterinary Support Network that continues to increase its membership. We continue to develop and expand the Pfoster Home Network with local and national individuals and bird clubs to assist with many of our programs.

The Foundation is working with other state animal control departments/agencies to provide a basic understanding of the specialized needs and care of parrots entering their facilities in greater numbers than ever before with educational material, resource support and transfer of birds. We have achieved strong international awareness through our website, and continue to work internationally with other organizations sharing similar goals, providing requested information and educational support.

Heavy metal serenade bird cage style
Heavy metal - bird cage style
Thanks to volunteers Marty K and his son for getting a big part of our cage scrap pile where it needed to be. Time to make certain that dangerous and poorly made cages ended up where they belong! 1500# of unusable cages brought us $78.34; vehicle, trailer - free; labor-free; gas $40. Net: $38.34.
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More of an eyesore. Oh for some huge cotttonwood trees.

Do you have an article you can share about the effects of bad cages on birds? Symptoms etc, of lead zinc toxicity etc. Also, how to test your cage? I would love something good to share with clients. (I have been wanting to look up an article, but keep forgetting! This reminded me and I thought you may have a good one! Thanks!!!

uncanny resemblance to how macaws pick something up - then throw it somewhere else!

not to mention the valuable real estate this stuff was occupying!

It was quite fun tossing old cages in a pile and the satisfaction of the crashing sound of metal to metal, and playing Frisbee with cage trays hitting the concrete back wall. We tried to see how far we could toss cages up into the pile. Icing on the cake was the big steel parrot beak crunching and squashing and tossing.

And the good news is the recycled steel could be used to make new parrot cages.

T. Rex!!!

Thanks Marty K and son :)

Good

Wow

Marty Koenig

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For Cockatoosday we're sharing some facts about the Cockatoos at TGF.

1. We currently have 41 Umbrella cockatoos (31 of which are males), 12 Moluccan cockatoos, 5 Bare-eyed cockatoos, 12 Sulphur Crested cockatoos, 6 Goffin's cockatoos and one Ducorp's cockatoo available for adoption. This equals 77 Cockatoos, almost 30% of our available birds. We have some cockatoos not available for adoption including Quigley, a Major Mitchell (Leadbetter) and Simon, an elderly Galah.
2. Most of the Cockatoos now onsite entered our care when they were between 15-21 years old.
3. The oldest Cockatoo we have available for adoption is 42 years old and the youngest is 5 years old.
4. The most common names we see for Cockatoos that come to us are Fred, Angel, Joey, Baby, Peaches, Sidney/Sydney, and Casper.
5. When a Cockatoo enters our care, they usually make friends rather quickly. Most of our Cockatoos are friends with another of the same gender. Some select more unusual friends. Dakota, U2 & Fred, OWA and Quigley with Sonny, a male Senegal.
6. In 2016, we adopted out a total of 214 birds, 21 were cockatoos. In 2016, 2 cockatoos, one Umbrella and one medium sulphur Crested were returned to us from different adopters.
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For Cockatoosday were sharing some facts about the Cockatoos at TGF.

1. We currently have 41 Umbrella cockatoos (31 of which are males), 12 Moluccan cockatoos, 5 Bare-eyed cockatoos, 12 Sulphur Crested cockatoos, 6 Goffins cockatoos and one Ducorps cockatoo available for adoption. This equals 77 Cockatoos, almost 30% of our available birds. We have some cockatoos not available  for adoption including Quigley, a Major Mitchell (Leadbetter) and Simon, an elderly Galah. 
2. Most of the Cockatoos now onsite entered our care when they were between 15-21 years old.
3. The oldest Cockatoo we have available for adoption is 42 years old and the youngest is 5 years old.  
4. The most common names we see for Cockatoos that come to us are Fred, Angel, Joey, Baby, Peaches, Sidney/Sydney, and Casper.
5. When a Cockatoo enters our care, they usually make friends rather quickly.  Most of our Cockatoos are friends with another of the same gender. Some select more unusual friends. Dakota, U2 & Fred, OWA and Quigley with Sonny, a male Senegal.
6. In 2016, we adopted out a total of 214 birds, 21 were cockatoos. In 2016, 2 cockatoos, one Umbrella  and one medium sulphur Crested  were returned to us from different adopters.

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For those of you interested in adopting from us, visit thegabrielfoundation.org/adoption/ and learn about the process. We do adopt out of state. Cockatoo adoption fees range from $350 to $500. All birds have undergone a complete avian wellness exam, are microchipped, and are housed to stay social with people and other birds. If adoption isn't realistic, we would love sponsors for our flock, especially our cockatoos. We would be thrilled for your support and that you have undertaken the care for one of our flock. There are many ways to support us, so learn more at thegabrielfoundation.org/donate/

Why so many cockatoo's?

I love cockatoos! I just think they're the best. I haven't met one I didn't like yet and that includes some that didn't get along with other people. Lol.

I really want an umbrella cockatoo! I have a Grey from you guys. She needs a friend. But we should move to a bigger house first 😪

Thank you for taking in these wonderful birds. They are lucky to be in a great place you have.

Kat has to ALWAYS say hi to the conures when he first comes out. He likes to make sure his flock well ;)

Wow, 77 cockatoos must be capable of creating quite a racket!

I have 3 c2s, and 1 m2. They are no problems other than my mc2 is constant screamer. But the rest are OK. Just have to provide them with lots of chew toys.

We would love a Cockatoo but my dad absolutely loves your pair of Military Macaws.

Brandee Sounds like a place you would love 😊

I'll take em!!!!!!!!!💙

all my friends and all beautiful

Fred Fred

Fabulous & interesting post!

Britney Hayward....adopt a new friend

That's interesting, because when I visited the facility in Emma years ago I thought you had about 75 cockatoos way back then! But that was my guess - I couldn't help but notice that so many needed homes.

How can we adopt them? I live in NC. How much is adoption fee?

Wish I could help them all.....I'm old and they would outlive me...

I love all the TGF 'toos! Even M2 Jessy who gave me a nasty bite! :-)

Yonah Two Bears

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3 days ago

The Gabriel Foundation

Hi, my name is Kiwi. I’m a handsome Blue-Fronted Amazon around the age of 44. I may be an older guy, but I have the energy of a teenager and still have many years ahead of me. My family gave me up because they moved and had a new baby. I would prefer a home where I'm the only bird, so I can have all the attention for myself. One of my favorite activities is learning new behaviors, because I am very food motivated. With some time working together as teacher (me) and student (you), and of course my favorite food treats, I know you and I can learn target training, and with your help I’ll be happy to touch targets, turn on a perch, and wave my foot on cue. They say you can't teach an old dog new tricks, but no one ever said you can't teach an old parrot new tricks. ... See MoreSee Less

Hi, my name is Kiwi. I’m a handsome Blue-Fronted Amazon around the age of 44.  I may be an older guy, but I have the energy of a teenager and still have many years ahead of me.  My family gave me up because they moved and had a new baby.  I would prefer a home where Im the only bird, so I can have all the attention for myself.  One of my favorite activities is learning new behaviors, because I am very food motivated.  With some time working together as teacher (me) and student (you), and of course  my favorite food treats, I know you and I can learn target training, and with your help I’ll be happy to touch targets, turn on a perch, and wave my foot on cue.  They say you cant teach an old dog new tricks, but no one ever said you cant teach an old parrot new tricks.

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I would love to have him here with me. My Orange Wing Amazon crossed the Rainbow Bridge the day after Christmas at the young age of only 32 because her previous owners let her suffer with Asper for years then gave her to someone who knows nothing about birds and he called me to take her. I only had her for 2.5 years, but I know she was happy and getting the medical care she needed.

I am a new parrot mama. She is a beauty, a Meyer . We are learning what each other likes. ( ok, to be honest it's mostly what she like). Before I purchased her I ask my daughter if when I become to old to take proper care of her she would. She agreed which gave me peace of mind. She has a sun conure.

I wish I could have him. I'm in Wisconsin though :(. My bird Dexter is old I love older birds

You can come live with me and my 3 babies. How far are you from Gainesville FL

I would love to get him my parakeet just died on Saturday and would love to get another bird.

Beautiful bird...So upsetting that people would give up their bird (a member of family) because of a move and a baby...Didn't they even think about this before acquriing this beautiful bird...I hope this beautiful bird finds a forever home..I can see if someone is very ill and can't take care of their baby anymore.

What is wrong with people? I'm beginning to think we should have to go through a very thorough screening process before we're allowed to keep a parrot from any source.

Such a beautiful bird. I hope he finds a forever home, instead of one that just gives him up because he's "inconvenient". Breaks my heart 💔

So so so sweet! I would adopt him in a heartbeat if I didn't already have two eclectus. They are already a handful but I love them more than anything. I would give him a home in a minute if I didn't already have parrots. This boy is so so so sweet wish I knew someone to give him a forever home. With lots of love. That's what he really really really deserves. Not someone who'll give him up just because of changes and situation someone who loves him and will adapt because they love him and they love their new situation no matter what. Poor kiwi he deserves more and a loving home where he is greatly appreciated. God bless you kiwi I hope you find your forever home soon.

The long life expectancy of parrots is probably rarely considered when deciding to bring one home as a pet. I adore my own but think it's time the long-lived ones be banned as pets. How many people commit to 40 plus years with these creatures? Not enough shelters. Very sad.

Poor baby, would you leave your child?

Love him. He can come to my house I live in Minnesota

I love his face!

He is very likable guy, I have met him.

I want him he can live with us for sure

Awwww, Kiwi, you're gorgeous, so sweet!

Shared!

Shame on them !!!

Typical story - so sad :(

Kelsey Rooney!!!

Buck Healy

I would love to have a chat with the people that gave him up. They would not like me.

Merry Tubb this is the site and peanut's cousin is up for adoption! ❤️😢

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