Education & Training

Education is a primary focus of The Gabriel Foundation’s. The only way to improve the lives of birds both in the wild and in captivity is to impart knowledge and create awareness of the needs of parrots around the world. We do this in the classroom, in the home and in the community.

Beyond the Bird Basics

This comprehensive online class is a requirement for all adopters and beneficial for anyone interested in caring for a bird. Whether you are a long time bird caregiver or new to feathered companionship, you will learn the most up to date information on diet and nutrition, husbandry, species differences, grooming, medical care and behavior. The cost is $40 – click here to register and begin!

Outreach & Events

We are excited about the opportunity to provide information regarding our programs, parrots and the focus of our programs about parrot welfare. We believe that it is important to share our knowledge and expertise about parrots to educate the public about the specialized needs of companion parrots.  Request an outreach event.

Printable Request Form. 

Also, TGF has developed a series of educational classes, as well as reference materials and lectures covering all topics of bird care for the parrot owner, enthusiast or potential adopter.

Standard of Care

The Gabriel Foundation® is a 501(c)(3) and 509(a)(2) non-profit corporation, licensed by the State of Colorado as a rescue and rehabilitative organization dedicated to the well being of companion parrots. The Foundation’s aviary is certified by the Model Aviculture Program (MAP) although the Foundation is NOT a parrot breeding facility. Data, record keeping and biosecurity standards promoted by MAP are applicable to a parrot welfare organization.

Our purpose is to serve as a research and educational model to the public-at-large, the veterinary medical community, the pet industry, humane animal welfare organizations and to the avicultural community and affiliated organizations about the need to provide appropriately for the welfare of parrots in captivity, often through rescue, rehabilitation and sanctuary programs for psittacine birds. We endeavor to generate continuing awareness of parrots throughout the world by supporting international conservation efforts that help to maintain and preserve them in their natural habitat.

The Foundation currently maintains seven separate programs: educational outreach, rescue, rehabilitation, foster care, adoption, sanctuary and conservation for the needs of parrots everywhere. We believe that public EDUCATION is the tool of choice to better the quality of life of parrots in captivity and to help preserve the world’s parrots in their wild habitats.

Download the entire Standard of Care PDF

A Fabulous Opportunity to Take This Course!

Sign up for the ParrotBAS online class now!
In order to learn more about parrot behavior in a detailed and comprehensive step by step method utilizing the principles of ABA (Applied Behavior Analysis). Registrants need a Yahoo ID. Requests to join ParrotBAS group can be sent to: http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/ParrotBAS/.

Once you are on the list, you must request to take the mini lessons. You will then be put on a wait list. Each mini lesson class consists of 3 students. As soon as 3 students have requested to take mini’s and a tutor is found, class will begin. Mini lessons consist of 7 lessons. You will not receive a certificate, so you will need to report to Shauna Roberts, [email protected] that you have completed the lessons. That way, Shauna can then check in the database to make sure that you’ve completed and finished the lessons.

This is a time-intensive course for registrant and mentor. Please allow significant time and thought to the high level of information that is contained within these lessons. This is a class that can be repeated many times with substantial benefit for human and bird with each series of mini-lessons. Please come prepared to read, think and learn!

Also, so you know, there is now a 3-year wait for Dr. Friedman’s LLP and LLA professional courses so sign-up now!

Consequences are environmental events that occur after a behavior. They are the result of an action and provide feedback to us. With that feedback, behaviors will either continue, increase or decrease. In other words, consequences provide us with learning experiences. For our purposes when working with animals we observe those consequences that immediately follow a behavior in order to know the function of a behavior and then we can work on a plan to change that behavior.

This week let's broaden that a bit to consider long-term consequences such as the shape of a bird's beak. Various beak shapes evolved through consequences according to each species diet. Feathers started out as scales and evolved to what we see today. Feathers are not only useful for locomotion but also for thermoregulation and protection.

This week I saw two interesting articles that involve consequences. One explaining why bird eggs have so many different shapes. What scientists found is that the shape of an egg depends on how much a bird species flies. Who knew!

www.nytimes.com/2017/06/22/science/bird-eggs-shapes-flight.html?emc=eta1

The second article I ran into showed house finches gathering cigarette butts to put in their nests as a pest repellent. By adding these they were not bothered by parasites. More learning due to consequences! Although the long-term consequence may not be favorable.

tinyurl.com/ya52zlfo

Enjoy!
... See MoreSee Less

Consequences are environmental events that occur after a behavior. They are the result of an action and provide feedback to us. With that feedback, behaviors will either continue, increase or decrease. In other words, consequences provide us with learning experiences.  For our purposes when working with animals we observe those consequences that immediately follow a behavior in order to know the function of a behavior and then we can work on a plan to change that behavior. 

This week lets broaden that a bit to consider long-term consequences such as the shape of a birds beak. Various beak shapes evolved through consequences according to each species diet. Feathers started out as scales and evolved to what we see today. Feathers are not only useful for locomotion but also for thermoregulation and protection. 

This week I saw two interesting articles that involve consequences. One explaining why bird eggs have so many different shapes. What scientists found is that the shape of an egg depends on how much a bird species flies. Who knew! 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/22/science/bird-eggs-shapes-flight.html?emc=eta1

The second article I ran into showed house finches gathering cigarette butts to put in their nests as a pest repellent. By adding these they were not bothered by parasites. More learning due to consequences! Although the long-term consequence may not be favorable. 

https://tinyurl.com/ya52zlfo 

Enjoy!

Comment on Facebook

Wow, both very interesting information, and things I didn t know, so them for sharing. On the subject of beaks, I have experienced some long term consequences of a bad diet, previous to me (Of course 😉). I took in my male ekkie, Mylo when he was 4 years old. He turns 9 on his next gotcha day of Sept. 19th. I am still having to trim his beak every few months or so because on his first vet check, within the first couple days I had him, he had some "troubling liver numbers" so went back at the 6 month Mark and again at the 1 year and by the one year mark my vet was totally astonished. She said if she had not seen him herself that first time I brought him in she wouldn't have believed it was the same bird. Big boost for the way I care for my birds and how I was taught, but most importantly he has shown awesome liver #'s and everything else since his 6 month check. However, his beak and nails are still growing a bit fast. They have certainly slowed down over the years, I use to trim monthly and now can go anywhere from 4-6 months between trimming. So, that just goes to show #1 how damaging a bad diet can be, even only after a few years, #2 how long it truly takes to right itself within the body, as he has had good #' s for going on 4 years now but still showing a small bit of evidence of the trauma. Here's a recent picture of him preening while sitting in the window, keeping an eye on all possible dangers for the flock. Yes, he is the lookout and sounds quite the call if he sees anything he doesn't like 😘😚

Curious about what the pictured parrot is eating...

3 days ago

The Gabriel Foundation

We're so excited that nearly all of our cockatiels have been adopted! Tyler and Jackie recently adopted cockatiels Whitebird and Greybird. These two not-so-creatively-named cuties came to us about two years ago and finally found a family to love them. We wish everyone in the family all the best and many happy years together!

(Note: Whitebird and Greybird are shown here in their travel cage)
... See MoreSee Less

Were so excited that nearly all of our cockatiels have been adopted!  Tyler and Jackie recently adopted cockatiels Whitebird and Greybird.  These two not-so-creatively-named cuties came to us about two years ago and finally found a family to love them.  We wish everyone in the family all the best and many happy years together!  

(Note: Whitebird and Greybird are shown here in their travel cage)

Comment on Facebook

That's great hope they will be getting a bigger cage.

So glad they have a new home! Well done! <3

Fantastic!!!!

Yay!!!

way to go TGF... 😍

I want one

wonderful news!

Yay!

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