Other Ways to Help

imageWe accept in-kind donations of bird supplies such as cages and toys as well as newspapers, phone books, and even cars & trucks!

Items can be dropped off during business hours or picked up depending on size.

Click here if you have a question on making an in-kind donation.

TIPS FOR CHARITABLE DONATIONS


Help the Birds Every Time You Search or Shop Online

Now you can help the birds of TGF every time you go online. Whether you are navigating the web or shopping online with your favorite retailers, this is such a great way to support a worthy cause without spending any money, and takes only a few seconds of your time.

The Gabriel Foundation has partnered with several online search and shopping sites who will donate a percentage of their profits to us – and all you have to do is sign up and go about your business as usual! Have a look, and start helping the birds now!

Shop Online through Adopt A Shelter!

The Gabriel Foundation is now listed on AdoptAShelter.com. Every time you and all of your fellow supporters shop using AdoptAShelter.com you are financially supporting The Gabriel Foundation. Remember, it’s easy to use (no login or password needed), it’s FREE and every purchase helps animals…so tell every animal lover you know!

GoodSearch.com & GoodShop.com

GoodSearch.com is a search engine that allows you to help TGF every time you search for anything on the internet – and the best part – it costs you NOTHING!

Plus, GoodSearch.com is also home to GoodShop – where they partner with merchants who also donate a portion of their proceeds to your chosen charity when you shop with them via the GoodShop website!

It’s as easy as that! Just click here to visit the GoodSearch website, designate The Gabriel Foundation as your charity, and help the birds every time you go online!

iGive.com

Join iGive and a percentage of your purchases from over 680 retailers will go to The Gabriel Foundation. All you need to do is go to iGive.com to sign up, choose TGF as your cause and then use their site to navigate to all of your online stores.

To choose TGF as your cause on the iGive website, enter:
State: Colorado
Cause Type: Animals
Cause: The Gabriel Foundation (currently we are located on page 5)

iBakesale.com

More merchants, same deal! Sign up with iBakesale.com, choose The Gabriel Foundation as your cause, and shop via their site with hundreds more online merchants. Voila, without spending an extra dime you will be helping the parrots and programs of TGF!

Donate your Car!

Wondering what to do with your used car or truck? Donating your old vehicle to The Gabriel Foundation is convenient, easy, and may qualify you for a tax deduction. And best of all, your donation of a used car or truck will make a big difference in supporting The Gabriel Foundation.

Why not donate your vehicle today?  All you need to do is to complete our simple online donation form  or call 1-866-628-2277 and we’ll take care of the rest. We will pick up your vehicle, arrange to have your donation towed, and provide you with a tax-deductible receipt, all at no charge to you. Call 1-866-628-2277 or online at https://www.vehiclesforcharity.org/Donate/GAF.html.

Questions? Check out the Frequently Asked Questions Document.

vehiclebut

Consequences are environmental events that occur after a behavior. They are the result of an action and provide feedback to us. With that feedback, behaviors will either continue, increase or decrease. In other words, consequences provide us with learning experiences. For our purposes when working with animals we observe those consequences that immediately follow a behavior in order to know the function of a behavior and then we can work on a plan to change that behavior.

This week let's broaden that a bit to consider long-term consequences such as the shape of a bird's beak. Various beak shapes evolved through consequences according to each species diet. Feathers started out as scales and evolved to what we see today. Feathers are not only useful for locomotion but also for thermoregulation and protection.

This week I saw two interesting articles that involve consequences. One explaining why bird eggs have so many different shapes. What scientists found is that the shape of an egg depends on how much a bird species flies. Who knew!

www.nytimes.com/2017/06/22/science/bird-eggs-shapes-flight.html?emc=eta1

The second article I ran into showed house finches gathering cigarette butts to put in their nests as a pest repellent. By adding these they were not bothered by parasites. More learning due to consequences! Although the long-term consequence may not be favorable.

tinyurl.com/ya52zlfo

Enjoy!
... See MoreSee Less

Consequences are environmental events that occur after a behavior. They are the result of an action and provide feedback to us. With that feedback, behaviors will either continue, increase or decrease. In other words, consequences provide us with learning experiences.  For our purposes when working with animals we observe those consequences that immediately follow a behavior in order to know the function of a behavior and then we can work on a plan to change that behavior. 

This week lets broaden that a bit to consider long-term consequences such as the shape of a birds beak. Various beak shapes evolved through consequences according to each species diet. Feathers started out as scales and evolved to what we see today. Feathers are not only useful for locomotion but also for thermoregulation and protection. 

This week I saw two interesting articles that involve consequences. One explaining why bird eggs have so many different shapes. What scientists found is that the shape of an egg depends on how much a bird species flies. Who knew! 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/22/science/bird-eggs-shapes-flight.html?emc=eta1

The second article I ran into showed house finches gathering cigarette butts to put in their nests as a pest repellent. By adding these they were not bothered by parasites. More learning due to consequences! Although the long-term consequence may not be favorable. 

https://tinyurl.com/ya52zlfo 

Enjoy!

Comment on Facebook

Wow, both very interesting information, and things I didn t know, so them for sharing. On the subject of beaks, I have experienced some long term consequences of a bad diet, previous to me (Of course 😉). I took in my male ekkie, Mylo when he was 4 years old. He turns 9 on his next gotcha day of Sept. 19th. I am still having to trim his beak every few months or so because on his first vet check, within the first couple days I had him, he had some "troubling liver numbers" so went back at the 6 month Mark and again at the 1 year and by the one year mark my vet was totally astonished. She said if she had not seen him herself that first time I brought him in she wouldn't have believed it was the same bird. Big boost for the way I care for my birds and how I was taught, but most importantly he has shown awesome liver #'s and everything else since his 6 month check. However, his beak and nails are still growing a bit fast. They have certainly slowed down over the years, I use to trim monthly and now can go anywhere from 4-6 months between trimming. So, that just goes to show #1 how damaging a bad diet can be, even only after a few years, #2 how long it truly takes to right itself within the body, as he has had good #' s for going on 4 years now but still showing a small bit of evidence of the trauma. Here's a recent picture of him preening while sitting in the window, keeping an eye on all possible dangers for the flock. Yes, he is the lookout and sounds quite the call if he sees anything he doesn't like 😘😚

Curious about what the pictured parrot is eating...

3 days ago

The Gabriel Foundation

We're so excited that nearly all of our cockatiels have been adopted! Tyler and Jackie recently adopted cockatiels Whitebird and Greybird. These two not-so-creatively-named cuties came to us about two years ago and finally found a family to love them. We wish everyone in the family all the best and many happy years together!

(Note: Whitebird and Greybird are shown here in their travel cage)
... See MoreSee Less

Were so excited that nearly all of our cockatiels have been adopted!  Tyler and Jackie recently adopted cockatiels Whitebird and Greybird.  These two not-so-creatively-named cuties came to us about two years ago and finally found a family to love them.  We wish everyone in the family all the best and many happy years together!  

(Note: Whitebird and Greybird are shown here in their travel cage)

Comment on Facebook

That's great hope they will be getting a bigger cage.

So glad they have a new home! Well done! <3

Fantastic!!!!

Yay!!!

way to go TGF... 😍

I want one

wonderful news!

Yay!

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