Blog

Wende and Sami’s Story

Posted on Tuesday, December 29th, 2015

  We met Wende years ago, when she adopted Sami (Samula) the Double Yellow-headed Amazon parrot from us. She has a smile that lights up her face and to witness the relationship she has with Sami is truly something special. This story we have to share with you is one that has resonated and touched many hearts this year,read more

The Night Before Christmas…..at The Gabriel Foundation

Posted on Wednesday, December 24th, 2014

Words adapted by Kelly McKee – Haynes  ‘ Twas the night before Christmas all through The Foundation Every creature was stirring via flight, feet or defecation! The toys were all hung in the cages with care; the African Greys counting to make sure it was fair. The husbandry staff was listening to Edgar’s loud crooning…read more

Support our Non-Feathered “Flock”

Posted on Saturday, December 13th, 2014

WANTED: TGF’s 4-LEGGED HAPPY TRAILS FUND With a flock of nearly 1000 birds under our wing, we hope TGF’s friends will remember the woolly, hairy and furry critters that count on us for their care.  Sponsorship for any one of these sanctuary residents is a gift with a real reward to share for the holidaysread more

Meet Buster the Cockatiel

Posted on Tuesday, November 25th, 2014

  Buster is one of the sweetest and charming cockatiels currently in our care, and he has a fondness for people and hanging out with some of our wonderful volunteers and staff. When Buster was placed into sanctuary with us, it was at his relinquisher’s request who wanted him to spend his days with aread more

Celebrating 20 Years of Service

Posted on Wednesday, November 19th, 2014

The Gabriel Foundation is celebrating 20 years of service with a fundraiser on Saturday, November 22, 2014 at The Shops at 9th Avenue from 2PM – 5PM, 899 Broadway, Denver, http://shopsat9thavenue.com/  (click here for location information) in the heart of The Golden Triangle. Mulled wine, cider, and light refreshments will be provided. We have aread more

Odie the Red Lored Amazon.

Posted on Saturday, November 15th, 2014

  Odie has been with TGF many years – at least half of his lifetime since he came into our care in 1997. Odie has a definite preference, at least in a home situation, for women, likely due to his first years as a companion bird. For him, a female caregiver means comfort, trust andread more

11/8/14 TBB Toy Making Workshop

Posted on Thursday, November 13th, 2014

Last weekend TBB hosted our last 2014 Toy Making Workshop with longtime friend and toy making guru, Andrea Frederick. We had the biggest turn out yet with close to thirty people in attendance! Andrea instructed the group on how to make small bird toys, foraging toys, repurposed toys from old toy parts, and large bird toysread more

Owning a Cockatoo: Mango’s Story

Posted on Thursday, October 30th, 2014

Adopting a bird, any bird, but especially a gregarious, large and active Moluccan cockatoo like Mango takes a lot of consideration and planning. And it takes considerable care and attention to keep daily enrichment activities ongoing and creative. We were happy a few years ago when Mango was adopted to a family in NJ whereread more

Top Ten Halloween Safety Tips From The ASPCA

Posted on Tuesday, October 14th, 2014

Attention, bird lovers, it’s almost the spookiest night of the year! The ASPCA recommends taking some common sense precautions this Halloween to keep you and your pet saying “trick or treat!” all the way to November 1. No tricks, no treats: That bowl of candy is for trick-or-treaters,         not for Scruffy andread more

Ask The Gabriel Foundation

Posted on Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

Hi There!  I have a question for you.  I have a young male English Budgie that I adore!  He is spoiled and loved by our whole family. He is a big time talker and can easily learn new phrases/words over a couple weeks.  Very cool!  I have wondered though, if it would be better forread more

Consequences are environmental events that occur after a behavior. They are the result of an action and provide feedback to us. With that feedback, behaviors will either continue, increase or decrease. In other words, consequences provide us with learning experiences. For our purposes when working with animals we observe those consequences that immediately follow a behavior in order to know the function of a behavior and then we can work on a plan to change that behavior.

This week let's broaden that a bit to consider long-term consequences such as the shape of a bird's beak. Various beak shapes evolved through consequences according to each species diet. Feathers started out as scales and evolved to what we see today. Feathers are not only useful for locomotion but also for thermoregulation and protection.

This week I saw two interesting articles that involve consequences. One explaining why bird eggs have so many different shapes. What scientists found is that the shape of an egg depends on how much a bird species flies. Who knew!

www.nytimes.com/2017/06/22/science/bird-eggs-shapes-flight.html?emc=eta1

The second article I ran into showed house finches gathering cigarette butts to put in their nests as a pest repellent. By adding these they were not bothered by parasites. More learning due to consequences! Although the long-term consequence may not be favorable.

tinyurl.com/ya52zlfo

Enjoy!
... See MoreSee Less

Consequences are environmental events that occur after a behavior. They are the result of an action and provide feedback to us. With that feedback, behaviors will either continue, increase or decrease. In other words, consequences provide us with learning experiences.  For our purposes when working with animals we observe those consequences that immediately follow a behavior in order to know the function of a behavior and then we can work on a plan to change that behavior. 

This week lets broaden that a bit to consider long-term consequences such as the shape of a birds beak. Various beak shapes evolved through consequences according to each species diet. Feathers started out as scales and evolved to what we see today. Feathers are not only useful for locomotion but also for thermoregulation and protection. 

This week I saw two interesting articles that involve consequences. One explaining why bird eggs have so many different shapes. What scientists found is that the shape of an egg depends on how much a bird species flies. Who knew! 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/22/science/bird-eggs-shapes-flight.html?emc=eta1

The second article I ran into showed house finches gathering cigarette butts to put in their nests as a pest repellent. By adding these they were not bothered by parasites. More learning due to consequences! Although the long-term consequence may not be favorable. 

https://tinyurl.com/ya52zlfo 

Enjoy!

Comment on Facebook

Wow, both very interesting information, and things I didn t know, so them for sharing. On the subject of beaks, I have experienced some long term consequences of a bad diet, previous to me (Of course 😉). I took in my male ekkie, Mylo when he was 4 years old. He turns 9 on his next gotcha day of Sept. 19th. I am still having to trim his beak every few months or so because on his first vet check, within the first couple days I had him, he had some "troubling liver numbers" so went back at the 6 month Mark and again at the 1 year and by the one year mark my vet was totally astonished. She said if she had not seen him herself that first time I brought him in she wouldn't have believed it was the same bird. Big boost for the way I care for my birds and how I was taught, but most importantly he has shown awesome liver #'s and everything else since his 6 month check. However, his beak and nails are still growing a bit fast. They have certainly slowed down over the years, I use to trim monthly and now can go anywhere from 4-6 months between trimming. So, that just goes to show #1 how damaging a bad diet can be, even only after a few years, #2 how long it truly takes to right itself within the body, as he has had good #' s for going on 4 years now but still showing a small bit of evidence of the trauma. Here's a recent picture of him preening while sitting in the window, keeping an eye on all possible dangers for the flock. Yes, he is the lookout and sounds quite the call if he sees anything he doesn't like 😘😚

Curious about what the pictured parrot is eating...

3 days ago

The Gabriel Foundation

We're so excited that nearly all of our cockatiels have been adopted! Tyler and Jackie recently adopted cockatiels Whitebird and Greybird. These two not-so-creatively-named cuties came to us about two years ago and finally found a family to love them. We wish everyone in the family all the best and many happy years together!

(Note: Whitebird and Greybird are shown here in their travel cage)
... See MoreSee Less

Were so excited that nearly all of our cockatiels have been adopted!  Tyler and Jackie recently adopted cockatiels Whitebird and Greybird.  These two not-so-creatively-named cuties came to us about two years ago and finally found a family to love them.  We wish everyone in the family all the best and many happy years together!  

(Note: Whitebird and Greybird are shown here in their travel cage)

Comment on Facebook

That's great hope they will be getting a bigger cage.

So glad they have a new home! Well done! <3

Fantastic!!!!

Yay!!!

way to go TGF... 😍

I want one

wonderful news!

Yay!

+ View previous comments