Avian Medical Requirements

 

At The Gabriel Foundation, the health of our feathered residents is a priority. We stress the importance of quality, life-long veterinary care. By nature, parrots mask their illnesses. Although medical testing results are not a guarantee that a bird is in good health, indicators of health problems may appear in test results prior to becoming a noticeable illness in your bird. To the best of our ability, we want to support and maintain the health of your current bird(s) and any you may adopt from us.  We thank you for supporting this important protocol.

1.             Please provide the Foundation with copies of birds’ veterinary records from your current or past veterinarian that indicate that birds in the home have been physically examined by a veterinarian with a special interest in avian medicine within the last 12 months and that are free of any signs of communicable disease.

2.             If 36 months or more has passed since the bird’s last comprehensive wellness exam, TGF requires includes Comprehensive Wellness exam. This is a requirement for birds 5 years of age or older. Please include these lab results along with test results which indicate that all bird(s) in the home have tested negative for Chlamydophila psittaci (Psittacosis).

3.             For flock testing protocol please discuss options for diagnostic testing for small birds, including lovebirds, cockatiels, budgerigars (parakeets), finches, canaries and diamond doves with your veterinarian.

4.             The Gabriel Foundation strongly recommends DNA Gender testing unless a bird is sexually dimorphic, has a history of egg laying, or a DNA Gender Analysis is available.

5.             You may be asked to provide documentation for “Old World” birds 25 years or older that the bird has tested negative for PBFD (Psittacine Beak and Feather Disease). Please note, this is NOT mandatory for all birds; but it may be important to rule out for Old World birds that came into the US prior to 1992 that have a 10 year plus history of feather destructive behavior.

Examples of “Old World” birds are Cockatoos, Eclectus, Lories, Ringnecks, Alexandrines, African Greys, Senegals, Red-bellies, Jardine’s, Meyers, Lovebirds, Budgies, Cockatiels & Vasas.

6.             “New World” birds should have a visual assessment as part of their physical  exam re. the presence of cloacal and/or choanal papillomas and those observations noted in the bird’s medical notes.

Examples of “New World” birds are Macaws, Amazons, Conures, Caiques, Pionus, Quakers & Parrotlets. These species’ lists are not comprehensive; please contact us if you do not see your bird’s species listed or if you have ANY related questions.

7.             TGF does not require diagnostic testing for PDD or Avian Borna Virus, unless a bird presents symptomatically with established criteria of generally accepted indicators related to either viral disease.

 

At the 2013 Association of Avian Veterinarians Conference, TGF’s vet network consisting of local and national avian veterinarians met to determine the basic requirements for birds entering TGF, exiting TGF, and boarding at TGF. These requirements affect what diagnostic testing for existing birds is required by potential adopters.  All participants agreed that testing and subsequent result interpretation can be nebulous.  There are a few tests that should be done to serve as a baseline for health status of birds entering TGF.

 

Chlamydophilia testing is not black and white.  In most cases, PCR is the test of choice but whatever method deemed appropriate by the bird’s veterinarian is reasonable.  The result needs to be interpreted with the knowledge of the CBC results which is why a current CBC is required. Chemistries don’t speak as strongly to the suspicion of contagious disease and are required for birds other than budgerigars, lovebirds, cockatiels, finches, doves and pigeons.

 

A current physical exam is required for multiple reasons.  First, it assures us that the current bird(s) in the household is being taken care of appropriately.  It also provides further assurance that the current bird(s) appears healthy. It allows for the opportunity of further testing (for PBFD, Borna virus, Herpes virus, etc.) should the physical exam uncover any marked abnormalities. Depending upon the bird’s history and location, fecal testing may be required to make sure the bird is parasite free.  Due to the size restriction of most samples, direct examination of the feces in a saline mount makes the most sense. In certain situations, flexibility is appropriate to batch test multiple individuals in a flock for Chlamydophila, or parasites.

 

These diagnostics are minimum requirements since the perfect screening regimen to catch all contagious diseases is not available at this time. If you or your veterinarian has questions about our medical requirements, please contact us. Flock health assessment for birds from diverse backgrounds is an important part of bird safety. For a faster response, submit your questions or concerns online at www.thegabrielfoundation.org/about/contact and select the General/Other drop down option. Thank you.

 

 

Julie Weiss Murad | CEO and President

The Gabriel Foundation Aviary & Adoption Center

39520 County Road 13, Elizabeth, CO 80107

T: 303.629.5900 x 214 ■  F: 303.646.1351

General questions: [email protected]

Heavy metal serenade bird cage style
Heavy metal - bird cage style
Thanks to volunteers Marty K and his son for getting a big part of our cage scrap pile where it needed to be. Time to make certain that dangerous and poorly made cages ended up where they belong! 1500# of unusable cages brought us $78.34; vehicle, trailer - free; labor-free; gas $40. Net: $38.34.
... See MoreSee Less

Comment on Facebook

More of an eyesore. Oh for some huge cotttonwood trees.

Do you have an article you can share about the effects of bad cages on birds? Symptoms etc, of lead zinc toxicity etc. Also, how to test your cage? I would love something good to share with clients. (I have been wanting to look up an article, but keep forgetting! This reminded me and I thought you may have a good one! Thanks!!!

uncanny resemblance to how macaws pick something up - then throw it somewhere else!

not to mention the valuable real estate this stuff was occupying!

It was quite fun tossing old cages in a pile and the satisfaction of the crashing sound of metal to metal, and playing Frisbee with cage trays hitting the concrete back wall. We tried to see how far we could toss cages up into the pile. Icing on the cake was the big steel parrot beak crunching and squashing and tossing.

And the good news is the recycled steel could be used to make new parrot cages.

T. Rex!!!

Thanks Marty K and son :)

Good

Wow

Marty Koenig

+ View previous comments

For Cockatoosday we're sharing some facts about the Cockatoos at TGF.

1. We currently have 41 Umbrella cockatoos (31 of which are males), 12 Moluccan cockatoos, 5 Bare-eyed cockatoos, 12 Sulphur Crested cockatoos, 6 Goffin's cockatoos and one Ducorp's cockatoo available for adoption. This equals 77 Cockatoos, almost 30% of our available birds. We have some cockatoos not available for adoption including Quigley, a Major Mitchell (Leadbetter) and Simon, an elderly Galah.
2. Most of the Cockatoos now onsite entered our care when they were between 15-21 years old.
3. The oldest Cockatoo we have available for adoption is 42 years old and the youngest is 5 years old.
4. The most common names we see for Cockatoos that come to us are Fred, Angel, Joey, Baby, Peaches, Sidney/Sydney, and Casper.
5. When a Cockatoo enters our care, they usually make friends rather quickly. Most of our Cockatoos are friends with another of the same gender. Some select more unusual friends. Dakota, U2 & Fred, OWA and Quigley with Sonny, a male Senegal.
6. In 2016, we adopted out a total of 214 birds, 21 were cockatoos. In 2016, 2 cockatoos, one Umbrella and one medium sulphur Crested were returned to us from different adopters.
... See MoreSee Less

For Cockatoosday were sharing some facts about the Cockatoos at TGF.

1. We currently have 41 Umbrella cockatoos (31 of which are males), 12 Moluccan cockatoos, 5 Bare-eyed cockatoos, 12 Sulphur Crested cockatoos, 6 Goffins cockatoos and one Ducorps cockatoo available for adoption. This equals 77 Cockatoos, almost 30% of our available birds. We have some cockatoos not available  for adoption including Quigley, a Major Mitchell (Leadbetter) and Simon, an elderly Galah. 
2. Most of the Cockatoos now onsite entered our care when they were between 15-21 years old.
3. The oldest Cockatoo we have available for adoption is 42 years old and the youngest is 5 years old.  
4. The most common names we see for Cockatoos that come to us are Fred, Angel, Joey, Baby, Peaches, Sidney/Sydney, and Casper.
5. When a Cockatoo enters our care, they usually make friends rather quickly.  Most of our Cockatoos are friends with another of the same gender. Some select more unusual friends. Dakota, U2 & Fred, OWA and Quigley with Sonny, a male Senegal.
6. In 2016, we adopted out a total of 214 birds, 21 were cockatoos. In 2016, 2 cockatoos, one Umbrella  and one medium sulphur Crested  were returned to us from different adopters.

Comment on Facebook

For those of you interested in adopting from us, visit thegabrielfoundation.org/adoption/ and learn about the process. We do adopt out of state. Cockatoo adoption fees range from $350 to $500. All birds have undergone a complete avian wellness exam, are microchipped, and are housed to stay social with people and other birds. If adoption isn't realistic, we would love sponsors for our flock, especially our cockatoos. We would be thrilled for your support and that you have undertaken the care for one of our flock. There are many ways to support us, so learn more at thegabrielfoundation.org/donate/

Why so many cockatoo's?

I love cockatoos! I just think they're the best. I haven't met one I didn't like yet and that includes some that didn't get along with other people. Lol.

I really want an umbrella cockatoo! I have a Grey from you guys. She needs a friend. But we should move to a bigger house first 😪

Thank you for taking in these wonderful birds. They are lucky to be in a great place you have.

Kat has to ALWAYS say hi to the conures when he first comes out. He likes to make sure his flock well ;)

Wow, 77 cockatoos must be capable of creating quite a racket!

I have 3 c2s, and 1 m2. They are no problems other than my mc2 is constant screamer. But the rest are OK. Just have to provide them with lots of chew toys.

We would love a Cockatoo but my dad absolutely loves your pair of Military Macaws.

Brandee Sounds like a place you would love 😊

I'll take em!!!!!!!!!💙

all my friends and all beautiful

Fred Fred

Fabulous & interesting post!

Britney Hayward....adopt a new friend

That's interesting, because when I visited the facility in Emma years ago I thought you had about 75 cockatoos way back then! But that was my guess - I couldn't help but notice that so many needed homes.

How can we adopt them? I live in NC. How much is adoption fee?

Wish I could help them all.....I'm old and they would outlive me...

I love all the TGF 'toos! Even M2 Jessy who gave me a nasty bite! :-)

Yonah Two Bears

+ View previous comments

3 days ago

The Gabriel Foundation

Hi, my name is Kiwi. I’m a handsome Blue-Fronted Amazon around the age of 44. I may be an older guy, but I have the energy of a teenager and still have many years ahead of me. My family gave me up because they moved and had a new baby. I would prefer a home where I'm the only bird, so I can have all the attention for myself. One of my favorite activities is learning new behaviors, because I am very food motivated. With some time working together as teacher (me) and student (you), and of course my favorite food treats, I know you and I can learn target training, and with your help I’ll be happy to touch targets, turn on a perch, and wave my foot on cue. They say you can't teach an old dog new tricks, but no one ever said you can't teach an old parrot new tricks. ... See MoreSee Less

Hi, my name is Kiwi. I’m a handsome Blue-Fronted Amazon around the age of 44.  I may be an older guy, but I have the energy of a teenager and still have many years ahead of me.  My family gave me up because they moved and had a new baby.  I would prefer a home where Im the only bird, so I can have all the attention for myself.  One of my favorite activities is learning new behaviors, because I am very food motivated.  With some time working together as teacher (me) and student (you), and of course  my favorite food treats, I know you and I can learn target training, and with your help I’ll be happy to touch targets, turn on a perch, and wave my foot on cue.  They say you cant teach an old dog new tricks, but no one ever said you cant teach an old parrot new tricks.

Comment on Facebook

I would love to have him here with me. My Orange Wing Amazon crossed the Rainbow Bridge the day after Christmas at the young age of only 32 because her previous owners let her suffer with Asper for years then gave her to someone who knows nothing about birds and he called me to take her. I only had her for 2.5 years, but I know she was happy and getting the medical care she needed.

I am a new parrot mama. She is a beauty, a Meyer . We are learning what each other likes. ( ok, to be honest it's mostly what she like). Before I purchased her I ask my daughter if when I become to old to take proper care of her she would. She agreed which gave me peace of mind. She has a sun conure.

I wish I could have him. I'm in Wisconsin though :(. My bird Dexter is old I love older birds

You can come live with me and my 3 babies. How far are you from Gainesville FL

I would love to get him my parakeet just died on Saturday and would love to get another bird.

Beautiful bird...So upsetting that people would give up their bird (a member of family) because of a move and a baby...Didn't they even think about this before acquriing this beautiful bird...I hope this beautiful bird finds a forever home..I can see if someone is very ill and can't take care of their baby anymore.

What is wrong with people? I'm beginning to think we should have to go through a very thorough screening process before we're allowed to keep a parrot from any source.

Such a beautiful bird. I hope he finds a forever home, instead of one that just gives him up because he's "inconvenient". Breaks my heart 💔

So so so sweet! I would adopt him in a heartbeat if I didn't already have two eclectus. They are already a handful but I love them more than anything. I would give him a home in a minute if I didn't already have parrots. This boy is so so so sweet wish I knew someone to give him a forever home. With lots of love. That's what he really really really deserves. Not someone who'll give him up just because of changes and situation someone who loves him and will adapt because they love him and they love their new situation no matter what. Poor kiwi he deserves more and a loving home where he is greatly appreciated. God bless you kiwi I hope you find your forever home soon.

The long life expectancy of parrots is probably rarely considered when deciding to bring one home as a pet. I adore my own but think it's time the long-lived ones be banned as pets. How many people commit to 40 plus years with these creatures? Not enough shelters. Very sad.

Poor baby, would you leave your child?

Love him. He can come to my house I live in Minnesota

I love his face!

He is very likable guy, I have met him.

I want him he can live with us for sure

Awwww, Kiwi, you're gorgeous, so sweet!

Shared!

Shame on them !!!

Typical story - so sad :(

Kelsey Rooney!!!

Buck Healy

I would love to have a chat with the people that gave him up. They would not like me.

Merry Tubb this is the site and peanut's cousin is up for adoption! ❤️😢

+ View previous comments