Our Hyacinth Macaw Adoption Policy

Hyacinth MacawWe regularly receive calls, emails and letters from people all around the U.S. and Europe who offer to take one of those “big blue birds” off of our hands. Many people state that they don’t care if it is disabled, a feather picker, male or female, or even is old! They’d just be happy to have one. For many people, the exquisitely beautiful and striking Hyacinth macaw is their dream bird. They have heard it’s a gentle giant, or a goofy, big clown, or that it is a really expensive status symbol; so many reasons and many of them inaccurate.

The Hyacinth macaw is an exceptionally large macaw and has a specialized high fat diet, and has enormous enrichment and exercise needs to stay happy, healthy and out of trouble. Providing the appropriate housing needs for this bird can be costly due to the destructive dismantling power of the massive beak. Hyacinths can easily intimidate a fearful human, and they can bully and even severely injure or kill a smaller parrot in a couple of seconds if left unsupervised or unattended for even a moment. True that this can happen with other species, but it is highly possible with a Hyacinth. They are among the royalty of the parrot world and they know it.

Our Hyacinths enjoy the space of a huge flight structures, and the benefits of living in a couple small flocks. They are wonderful educators and thrill visitors that are amazed by their brilliance, size, agility and raucous vocalizations. We have made the decision that if one of our members or friends wishes to acquire a Hyacinth that we will direct them to a variety of sources so that they may find the bird that is the one for them. We will provide nutritional, husbandry, housing and behavioral guidance so that the human/bird relationship has a chance to be a healthy, strong one, no matter what age the Hyacinth is at acquisition, provided that it is a weaned bird at purchase. We make no money from any bird sale as a result of a referral, although we are duly grateful when we receive a donation in honor of the bird’s new family. Our interest is to help make certain that the bird stays in the home, through tough and good times. We want to know that the individual, breeder or pet store will offer full support to that customer and work with them long term if needed for the welfare of that bird.

Our flock of 12  Hyacinths has birds from differing origins: Goober was a purchase for and by Julie Murad after Gabriel’s death; 9 are with us in sanctuary, 1 was gifted to the Foundation and 1 was a cruelty intake. So, thank you for inquiring as to their availability; you now know why we say, “None available.”

When a bird enters TGF’s care, the person placing his/her bird has options about what they want for their bird’s future. Lifetime care is an option. Every Hyacinth that is with us has an owner who made that decision for their bird. If that is the decision, then TGF honors it. Birds enter our lifetime care program mainly for 2 reasons: the relinquisher’s wishes and support for their bird; TGF birds who are not widely adoptable and for whom a life with a bird flock is in the bird’s best interest, or the bird’s species is a flagship for its IUCN status.

There are alternatives for the public other than adoption to obtain or purchase a Hyacinth macaw, Blue throated macaw, Red fronted macaw, Red bellied macaw, Great green macaw, Golden conure, Blue headed macaw, Major Mitchell’s (Leadbetter’s), Blue eyed, Palm and other black cockatoos, Vasa parrot, Rüppell’s, and the Brown necked Cape parrot poicephalus species along with other species or color mutations that have a coveted cachet.

And sometimes it is about the money – there are people want to have a particular bird species at a highly discounted price. For The Gabriel Foundation, the cost of care of any of the above species is about the same for others of the same size or genus. Some exceptions are the type of housing, specialized diet and the ability to flock and spend time in outdoor aviaries with conspecifics.

*At this time, The Gabriel Foundation does not adopt out several other species, including Red fronted macaws, Blue throated macaws, or Golden conures. Each of these birds in residence with us was placed into our lifetime sanctuary care program.

This is a great time to adopt. Birds included! Did you know that funds from the CPOP and license plate fund help animal shelters specifically? Thanks to the generous CO residents who checked off a donation to this fund on their taxes, and for those who purchase a CPOP License Plate, this fund dispersed over $315,000.00 to shelters, funds ranging from $2K - $30K. These funds are specifically for veterinary/medical expenses. With your support, TGF benefitted by a $4000.00 grant from this fund. This helps us offset the cost of veterinary care for our birds, especially those from hoarding, animal control, cruelty, shelter transfers and relinquishments that are unable to provide any funding to assist TGF's veterinary costs. Thank you CO animal and bird lovers.Help prevent unwanted pet births by donating on your income tax form to the Colorado Pet Overpopulation Fund. www.savecoloradopets.org ... See MoreSee Less

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Comment on Facebook

adoption is the only way to go - I have been adopting my entire life and currently have 8 birds, 6 cats and 2 Greyhounds - all adopted as unwanted or rescues - they fill my heart and home with so much love I can't begin to explain my happiness♥

2 days ago

The Gabriel Foundation

Eagle scout Ryan Read gathered the other members of his troop, taught them how to make large bird toys, and made the most wonderful truck-full of bird toys you can imagine. They got a production line going and surpassed our dreams by making over 250 toys in just one day. Our flock is so grateful that Ryan chose to work with us for his Eagle Scout project and make much needed large bird enrichment. Thank you to your entire troop for all of your hard work! ... See MoreSee Less

Eagle scout Ryan Read gathered the other members of his troop, taught them how to make large bird toys, and made the most wonderful truck-full of bird toys you can imagine. They got a production line going and surpassed our dreams by making over 250 toys in just one day. Our flock is so grateful that Ryan chose  to work with us for his Eagle Scout project and make much needed large bird enrichment. Thank you to your entire troop for all of your hard work!

Comment on Facebook

Wow I need to hear a lot of stories like this these days! Wonderful project and such a terrific and appreciated gift to the birds of TGF! Thank you Eagle Scouts and Ryan Read for showing what real leadership is about.

There are wonderful human beings out there. Thank you to them❤️

WONDERFUL TROOP!! So happy, made my week!

Can't wait to start hanging them up!

Thanks Eagle Scouts. Git 'er done!

That's terrific!

Awesome!

Great Job Ryan!

Way to go!

Awesome.

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3 days ago

The Gabriel Foundation

Attention music aficionados! Higgins would love to share his interest in jazz and blues with just the right person. Higgins is a wild caught Timneh African Grey parrot, purchased in 1983 from a now closed pet store. Wild caught Grey parrots were widely imported into the bird sales market before the Wild Bird Conservation Act went into effect in 1992. Higgins is a hoot, from the whistling with vibrato and a gravelly voice to the sounds of fingers snapping and of course his fondness for jazz and blues. Along with his taste in music Higgins now enjoys a varied diet and requests that his new home has plenty of wood to shred, toilet paper rolls and cardboard to take apart, bite by bite. Invest in Higgin's trust and you will reap the rewards!

For more information about our adoption process, please visit our website.

thegabrielfoundation.org/adoption/adoption-process/
... See MoreSee Less

Attention music aficionados! Higgins would love to share his interest in jazz and blues with just the right person. Higgins is a wild caught Timneh African Grey parrot, purchased in 1983 from a now closed pet store. Wild caught Grey parrots were widely imported into the bird sales market before the Wild Bird Conservation Act went into effect in 1992. Higgins is a hoot, from the whistling with vibrato and a gravelly voice to the sounds of fingers snapping and of course his fondness for jazz and blues. Along with his taste in music Higgins now enjoys a varied diet and requests that his new home has plenty of wood to shred, toilet paper rolls and cardboard to take apart, bite by bite. Invest in Higgins trust and you will reap the rewards!

For more information about our adoption process, please visit our website.

http://thegabrielfoundation.org/adoption/adoption-process/

Comment on Facebook

Hope he finds a wonderful forever home! His little face is so full of personality. I thought wild caught were less likely to pluck? What is his feather problem?

Love it. I play violin for the animals at the zoo and Marvel :)

I had a wild caught B&G, my best buddy. Miss him every day. Dr.s estimate he was 40-50 at the time of his passing based on his band #. He was a rescue with an unknown history. All we had was band # and what quarantine station he came from with a approximation of what year he passed through.

Timnehs are wonderful birds. We had a wildcaught TAG years ago (had come from the shelter) that was the most loving and loyal parrot after six months of gently gaining his trust. Wish we weren't so far away...in CA.

Aww hope he gets a good home!

He's beautiful! Wish I were closer

I fell in love with his personality while volunteering. He is a wonderful little guy. Sassy too!

I think I'm in love! TAG's are the best!

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