Adoption Process and Requirements

We’re delighted you are interested in adopting a bird from The Gabriel Foundation! We have many wonderful birds that are just waiting to find their family and start a new life.

What is the adoption process?

There are a number of steps involved in making the adoption process a successful and positive experience for both you and your potential new bird companion(s):

  • A completed adoption application
    • We use this valuable information to help us find a bird that fits with your personality, lifestyle, experience and expectations.
  • Completion of the Beyond Bird Basics class
    • This is an online class that you can take at your own pace and you will continue to have access to these educational materials for reference in the future.
  • Take a tour of our aviary and adoption center
    • We ask that all potential adopters take a tour of our aviary and adoption center in Elizabeth, CO, where most of our birds are housed. This will allow you to see a variety of species of birds, see enrichment and housing options and get an idea how the birds are fed and cared for on a daily basis.
  • Meet the birds!
    • It may take awhile for you to “connect” with a bird, so it’s possible that multiple visits over time will be required. Don’t get discouraged if you don’t find your new companion right away, or if the bird you have your heart set on doesn’t seem interested. It can take time to earn trust and form a relationship with them.
  • Home visit
    • Once you have chosen the bird (or birds) that you wish to adopt, we will do a home visit to help you get everything ready for your new feathered companion. If you are not in our local area, we will be happy to work with you to find a suitable substitute for an in-person home visit.
  • If you have birds already, a copy of their veterinary test results must be provided
    • Every bird that comes into The Gabriel Foundation is screened for viruses and general health. We require birds in the home of the potential adopter to meet those same standards – for the health and safety of our birds as well as theirs. The medical requirements have been set up by TGF’s primary avian veterinary partners, Dr. Kris Ahlgrim and Dr. Jerry Labonde.

What are the fees for adopting a bird?

There is an initial application fee, which covers a 1-yr membership to The Gabriel Foundation (or a 1-yr extension if you are already a member), your choice of one of a group of selected educational avian books or DVDs (up to $25 value) and the Beyond Bird Basics online course materials and quizzes ($40 value).

The actual adoption fee varies from bird to bird and ranges from $50 to over $1000. Many factors are taken into account, including the species, age, health, and overall adopt-ability of the bird. Once you have chosen a specific bird (or birds) we can give you an exact fee. In general, you can expect to pay an adoption fee that is approximately 50% of what you would pay from a private party or retail operation.

Why do we charge an application fee on top of the adoption fee?

We occasionally get this question from potential adopters and thought it would be helpful to provide an explanation. First of all, we are committed to making every adoption a successful one, for both the bird and the adopter. This fee helps to cover the costs of our educational materials and provide you with the best possible start to a life with your new bird.

In addition, your decision to apply and pay the fee tells us that you are serious about adopting a bird from us and committed to the process. In the past, we had a significant number of people who would apply and spend time visiting with the birds, but never followed through on adopting. As a not-for-profit organization, we simply do not have the resources available to dedicate large amounts of time for this. It wasn’t fair to our staff or the birds.

How long does the adoption process take?

Generally, depending on how quickly you “connect” with a bird, you can expect the adoption process to take between 6-10 weeks for the bird to come to your home. There is a 90-day probationary adoption period initially during which time you will be asked to send regular reports to us on how the adjustment is going. At the end of the 90 days, assuming all is going well and you wish to make the bird a permanent member of your household, permanent adoption paperwork will be sent for you to complete.

It seems like The Gabriel Foundation makes the adoption process very difficult! Why is this?

It is not our intent to frustrate anyone or make it impossible to add a bird to your family. We take the responsibility for each bird in our care very seriously and we want them to be successful in their new home. We take time to make sure each adopter has all the tools needed for long term success. We are invested in the lifetime of each bird that comes through The Gabriel Foundation and we appreciate that you are taking the time to commit to that same level of care.

The combined years of experience we all bring to The Gabriel Foundation ranging from veterinary medicine, aviculture, companion parrot care and parrot welfare has helped us to develop this protocol that sets the birds (and you!) up for the best chance of success.

Why don’t you adopt out any Hyacinth macaws?

Read about our Hyacinth macaw adoption policy.

This is a great time to adopt. Birds included! Did you know that funds from the CPOP and license plate fund help animal shelters specifically? Thanks to the generous CO residents who checked off a donation to this fund on their taxes, and for those who purchase a CPOP License Plate, this fund dispersed over $315,000.00 to shelters, funds ranging from $2K - $30K. These funds are specifically for veterinary/medical expenses. With your support, TGF benefitted by a $4000.00 grant from this fund. This helps us offset the cost of veterinary care for our birds, especially those from hoarding, animal control, cruelty, shelter transfers and relinquishments that are unable to provide any funding to assist TGF's veterinary costs. Thank you CO animal and bird lovers.Help prevent unwanted pet births by donating on your income tax form to the Colorado Pet Overpopulation Fund. www.savecoloradopets.org ... See MoreSee Less

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Comment on Facebook

adoption is the only way to go - I have been adopting my entire life and currently have 8 birds, 6 cats and 2 Greyhounds - all adopted as unwanted or rescues - they fill my heart and home with so much love I can't begin to explain my happiness♥

2 days ago

The Gabriel Foundation

Eagle scout Ryan Read gathered the other members of his troop, taught them how to make large bird toys, and made the most wonderful truck-full of bird toys you can imagine. They got a production line going and surpassed our dreams by making over 250 toys in just one day. Our flock is so grateful that Ryan chose to work with us for his Eagle Scout project and make much needed large bird enrichment. Thank you to your entire troop for all of your hard work! ... See MoreSee Less

Eagle scout Ryan Read gathered the other members of his troop, taught them how to make large bird toys, and made the most wonderful truck-full of bird toys you can imagine. They got a production line going and surpassed our dreams by making over 250 toys in just one day. Our flock is so grateful that Ryan chose  to work with us for his Eagle Scout project and make much needed large bird enrichment. Thank you to your entire troop for all of your hard work!

Comment on Facebook

Wow I need to hear a lot of stories like this these days! Wonderful project and such a terrific and appreciated gift to the birds of TGF! Thank you Eagle Scouts and Ryan Read for showing what real leadership is about.

There are wonderful human beings out there. Thank you to them❤️

WONDERFUL TROOP!! So happy, made my week!

Can't wait to start hanging them up!

Thanks Eagle Scouts. Git 'er done!

That's terrific!

Awesome!

Great Job Ryan!

Way to go!

Awesome.

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3 days ago

The Gabriel Foundation

Attention music aficionados! Higgins would love to share his interest in jazz and blues with just the right person. Higgins is a wild caught Timneh African Grey parrot, purchased in 1983 from a now closed pet store. Wild caught Grey parrots were widely imported into the bird sales market before the Wild Bird Conservation Act went into effect in 1992. Higgins is a hoot, from the whistling with vibrato and a gravelly voice to the sounds of fingers snapping and of course his fondness for jazz and blues. Along with his taste in music Higgins now enjoys a varied diet and requests that his new home has plenty of wood to shred, toilet paper rolls and cardboard to take apart, bite by bite. Invest in Higgin's trust and you will reap the rewards!

For more information about our adoption process, please visit our website.

thegabrielfoundation.org/adoption/adoption-process/
... See MoreSee Less

Attention music aficionados! Higgins would love to share his interest in jazz and blues with just the right person. Higgins is a wild caught Timneh African Grey parrot, purchased in 1983 from a now closed pet store. Wild caught Grey parrots were widely imported into the bird sales market before the Wild Bird Conservation Act went into effect in 1992. Higgins is a hoot, from the whistling with vibrato and a gravelly voice to the sounds of fingers snapping and of course his fondness for jazz and blues. Along with his taste in music Higgins now enjoys a varied diet and requests that his new home has plenty of wood to shred, toilet paper rolls and cardboard to take apart, bite by bite. Invest in Higgins trust and you will reap the rewards!

For more information about our adoption process, please visit our website.

http://thegabrielfoundation.org/adoption/adoption-process/

Comment on Facebook

Hope he finds a wonderful forever home! His little face is so full of personality. I thought wild caught were less likely to pluck? What is his feather problem?

Love it. I play violin for the animals at the zoo and Marvel :)

I had a wild caught B&G, my best buddy. Miss him every day. Dr.s estimate he was 40-50 at the time of his passing based on his band #. He was a rescue with an unknown history. All we had was band # and what quarantine station he came from with a approximation of what year he passed through.

Timnehs are wonderful birds. We had a wildcaught TAG years ago (had come from the shelter) that was the most loving and loyal parrot after six months of gently gaining his trust. Wish we weren't so far away...in CA.

Aww hope he gets a good home!

He's beautiful! Wish I were closer

I fell in love with his personality while volunteering. He is a wonderful little guy. Sassy too!

I think I'm in love! TAG's are the best!

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