Adopt a Bird!

Lindsey and Smoky Joe, Congo African GreyOur experienced staff members work intensively with individuals interested in adopting birds. Over time, we have developed and established a structured screening and adoption process that we feel gives both the adopter and bird the best possible start at their new life together.

If you are thinking about adopting a bird from us, we encourage you to take a tour of our Aviary and Adoption Center located in Elizabeth. While on the tour, you will have a chance to see many of the different birds we have, their environment, and learn how we care for them. You’ll also have an opportunity to ask questions and interact with a few of our “ambassador birds”.

If you’ve decided you are ready to start the adoption or foster care process, we require you to complete one of our applications listed below. You will then proceed through a series of telephone and/or e-mail interviews (email tends to work better for us, as we are often not at our desks), take our online Beyond Bird Basics class, and then start the exciting part – meeting birds and finding your potential new family member! If possible, we encourage you to make multiple site/bird visits as a potential adopter.

So often people “look” for a bird of a particular species, when in our experience many birds will “choose” the person they prefer, which contributes to the success of the match. For adopters visiting from other states, a multi-day stay is recommended so that we may Star the Lovebird Gets Adoptedmonitor and assess your interaction with birds, and the staff has an opportunity to become familiar with your needs and wants for your adopted bird. The bird’s housing, routine and care, personality, history and inclusion into the adopter’s home are discussed at great length.

Depending upon the location of the potential adopter, TGF or a representative may conduct home inspections prior to and/or post-adoption. If you are located in an area where it isn’t feasible for us to conduct an in-home visit, we are happy to work with you to come up with a suitable solution. Sometimes emailing photos and videos will work, and we’ve even occasionally checked out an adoptive home environment over Skype! We invest a tremendous amount of time and resources before and after adoption, to ensure the best fit between the adopter and bird and most importantly, the bird’s future welfare.

PLEASE READ: About Adopting A Bird From The Gabriel Foundation (Adoption Protocol)

Do you have questions that are not answered here? Fill out our Adoption Inquiry form!

Are You Ready to Bring a Bird Into Your Home?

We have the following applications for you to choose from:

To view adoptable Gabriel Foundation birds, please go to Petfinder.com or Adopt-A-Pet.com!

5 hours ago

The Gabriel Foundation

Attention music aficionados! Higgins would love to share his interest in jazz and blues with just the right person. Higgins is a wild caught Timneh African Grey parrot, purchased in 1983 from a now closed pet store. Wild caught Grey parrots were widely imported into the bird sales market before the Wild Bird Conservation Act went into effect in 1992. Higgins is a hoot, from the whistling with vibrato and a gravelly voice to the sounds of fingers snapping and of course his fondness for jazz and blues. Along with his taste in music Higgins now enjoys a varied diet and requests that his new home has plenty of wood to shred, toilet paper rolls and cardboard to take apart, bite by bite. Invest in Higgin's trust and you will reap the rewards!

For more information about our adoption process, please visit our website.

thegabrielfoundation.org/adoption/adoption-process/
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Attention music aficionados! Higgins would love to share his interest in jazz and blues with just the right person. Higgins is a wild caught Timneh African Grey parrot, purchased in 1983 from a now closed pet store. Wild caught Grey parrots were widely imported into the bird sales market before the Wild Bird Conservation Act went into effect in 1992. Higgins is a hoot, from the whistling with vibrato and a gravelly voice to the sounds of fingers snapping and of course his fondness for jazz and blues. Along with his taste in music Higgins now enjoys a varied diet and requests that his new home has plenty of wood to shred, toilet paper rolls and cardboard to take apart, bite by bite. Invest in Higgins trust and you will reap the rewards!

For more information about our adoption process, please visit our website.

http://thegabrielfoundation.org/adoption/adoption-process/

Comment on Facebook

Timnehs are wonderful birds. We had a wildcaught TAG years ago (had come from the shelter) that was the most loving and loyal parrot after six months of gently gaining his trust. Wish we weren't so far away...in CA.

I fell in love with his personality while volunteering. He is a wonderful little guy. Sassy too!

I think I'm in love! TAG's are the best!

He's beautiful! Wish I were closer

Building a Trust Account

What is trust? Dictionary: firm belief in the reliability, truth, ability, or strength of someone or something. “relations have to be built on trust”.

To build a trust account think of it as making deposits or withdraws into a trust account at a relationship bank. Some behaviors will build trust while other actions will deplete it.

We build trust with parrots by not pushing our own agenda onto them such as we ask them to step-up and if they don't at that moment we don't force it. What we might do instead is wait a few minutes to try again or request some high probability behaviors for momentum the bird might do such as bouncing up and down, target to our hand, and then request step-up and always reinforce that behavior with something the bird values such as a head scritch or piece of favorite food.

There may be times when we take a withdraw from the trust account. Perhaps there a sudden emergency such as a house fire. We request step-up, but the bird remains perched so we grab the bird in order to get it to safety. If we have built a large trust account forcing that once step-up shouldn't damage our relationship however if we haven't made many trust deposits that forced step-up could certainly push our relationship backward.

There are some very old suggestions that used to common but only withdraw from accounts. Some of those suggestions are laddering a bird. This is when a bird is misbehaving so a person tells the bird to step up onto one hand to the other, over and over and over again. This is not trust building! Another is squirting a bird with water or covering its cage for screaming. Making a bird do what you tell it to do no matter what, damaging. Shaking a cage, shaking a hand to avoid a bite. There are many ways to damage trust.

Work on making deposits rather than withdraws. Empower any bird to have a choice in decisions and you'll be building a healthy relationship.

poster pic: behaviorworks.org
... See MoreSee Less

Building a Trust Account

What is trust? Dictionary: firm belief in the reliability, truth, ability, or strength of someone or something. “relations have to be built on trust”. 

To build a trust account think of it as making deposits or withdraws into a trust account at a relationship bank. Some behaviors will build trust while other actions will deplete it. 

We build trust with parrots by not pushing our own agenda onto them such as we ask them to step-up and if they dont at that moment we dont force it. What we might do instead is wait a few minutes to try again or request some high probability behaviors for momentum the bird might do such as bouncing up and down, target to our hand, and then request step-up and always reinforce that behavior with something the bird values such as a head scritch or piece of favorite food. 

There may be times when we take a withdraw from the trust account. Perhaps there a sudden emergency such as a house fire. We request step-up, but the bird remains perched so we grab the bird in order to get it to safety. If we have built a large trust account forcing that once step-up shouldnt damage our relationship however if we havent made many trust deposits that forced step-up could certainly push our relationship backward. 

There are some very old suggestions that used to common but only withdraw from accounts. Some of those suggestions are laddering a bird. This is when a bird is misbehaving so a person tells the bird to step up onto one hand to the other, over and over and over again. This is not trust building! Another is squirting a bird with water or covering its cage for screaming. Making a bird do what you tell it to do no matter what, damaging. Shaking a cage, shaking a hand to avoid a bite. There are many ways to damage trust. 

Work on making deposits rather than withdraws. Empower any bird to have a choice in decisions and youll be building a healthy relationship. 

poster pic: behaviorworks.org

Comment on Facebook

When Rio a 20 yr old dblyelhd, came to live with us he stepped right up and promptly bit hard. We told him he had rights and he saw that Casey our 7 yr old dblyelhd would back up or tell us in some way that he did not want to step up, Rio tried it and found out he too could say no and has not bit since. We think he was always forced to do what was asked and now he gets to exercise his rights and we see a big happy amazon instead of the angry baby that came to live with us 4 years ago.

I love this! Maybe I'm a nut, but I ask for a step up or a chance to give scritches to our formerly bitey, lungey, nervous Amazon. He shakes his head no (step up) or gapes his beak calmly (scritches) and when I listen to his "No" he fluffs and yawns and looks at me with total love. The yesses are getting more and more frequent, which is great, but even better, he's happy and feels safe.