Bird with Almonds

Our Story

The Gabriel Foundation is a parrot welfare organization providing for the complete physical, psychological and environmental well being of the parrots in our care. Through the education of the public, proper legal documentation, extensive support services, and constant follow-up procedures, we ensure that whether the parrots remain in a sanctuary, in rehabilitation, or are placed into adoptive or foster homes, that the parrots are continually nurtured. The Gabriel Foundation also provides for the general welfare of parrots in the community by providing accurate, comprehensive and reliable educational materials and resources to the public.

View our Purpose and Mission (.pdf) »


With the proliferation of psittacine birds into the pet marketplace, the issue of unwanted birds is rapidly growing. This is no longer one person’s problem or even one industry’s problem. It speaks to the entire issue of being responsible for anyone and anything in your life for which you have chosen stewardship. All living creatures deserve respect and kindness.

Societies value birds for economic, cultural, ethical and spiritual reasons. The avicultural and pet industries must heighten public consciousness that animals are not creatures put on this earth for man to dominate, or “own,” but rather they are “other nations” with which to co-exist. The disposable mentality or throwaway cultural attitude prevalent in our society does not speak well for the lives of animals often viewed as commodities that are greatly affected by this trend. They cannot fend for themselves when we do not. TGF receives inquiries daily from around the country because people must “get rid of their birds”. The hundreds of inquiries received monthly regarding our programs demonstrate that there is an overwhelming need to provide continuing education and information to the public, the veterinary community and the avicultural industry about the physical, psychological, social, environmental, medical and nutritional needs necessary to provide for the total well being of these highly intelligent, long-lived creatures.

The challenge for veterinarians, breeders, retailers, hobbyists, welfare, rescue and sanctuary groups for companion animals is the realization that there are not enough facilities providing appropriate standards of care for the animals dependent upon their care. The Gabriel Foundation® is currently a part of a working committee of the Association of Avian Veterinarians whose task is to develop a standard of care for parrot welfare organizations, which include rescue and sanctuary groups. The Foundation is also an integral part of the WPWA (World Parrot Welfare Alliance), an international parrot welfare organization whose goal is to develop and promote greater awareness of the needs of parrots in captivity, whether in homes, rescue, sanctuary, or breeding facilities and in the retail pet trade through a set of guidelines and standards.

The Gabriel Foundation’s Aviary and Adoption Center is currently providing consistent, high quality care for over 800 psittacine birds. Birds come to TGF for a variety of reasons such as family or financial hardship, human guardian’s illness or death, conflict with spouse or children, lack of human interest and/or time, moving/relocation, a bird’s incomparability with human’s expectations, a bird’s physical handicap, a bird’s chronic illness, rescue from animal cruelty, abandonment, lost bird, or request from a pet store, animal welfare organization, veterinarian and breeders to provide on-going care.

Our team of avian veterinary partners evaluate the acute, chronic and long-term medical needs of all incoming and outgoing birds. Our entire team of attending and affiliated avian veterinarians, certified veterinary technicians, staff members and volunteers provides for the total health care, as well as psychological and environmental needs. Our staff-to-bird ratio is crucial to the rehabilitation process of our psittacine residents, where the needs of the individual bird come first. With the in-depth quality of care that TGF provides, many caring and committed adoptive families and guardians provide homes for those birds who will continue to thrive in a companion pet situation through The Gabriel Foundation’s highly structured adoption and screening process. For those birds that remain with us for the remainder of their lives, permanent sanctuary is a safe and enriched habitat dedicated to each resident’s well-being.

Consequences are environmental events that occur after a behavior. They are the result of an action and provide feedback to us. With that feedback, behaviors will either continue, increase or decrease. In other words, consequences provide us with learning experiences. For our purposes when working with animals we observe those consequences that immediately follow a behavior in order to know the function of a behavior and then we can work on a plan to change that behavior.

This week let's broaden that a bit to consider long-term consequences such as the shape of a bird's beak. Various beak shapes evolved through consequences according to each species diet. Feathers started out as scales and evolved to what we see today. Feathers are not only useful for locomotion but also for thermoregulation and protection.

This week I saw two interesting articles that involve consequences. One explaining why bird eggs have so many different shapes. What scientists found is that the shape of an egg depends on how much a bird species flies. Who knew!

www.nytimes.com/2017/06/22/science/bird-eggs-shapes-flight.html?emc=eta1

The second article I ran into showed house finches gathering cigarette butts to put in their nests as a pest repellent. By adding these they were not bothered by parasites. More learning due to consequences! Although the long-term consequence may not be favorable.

tinyurl.com/ya52zlfo

Enjoy!
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Consequences are environmental events that occur after a behavior. They are the result of an action and provide feedback to us. With that feedback, behaviors will either continue, increase or decrease. In other words, consequences provide us with learning experiences.  For our purposes when working with animals we observe those consequences that immediately follow a behavior in order to know the function of a behavior and then we can work on a plan to change that behavior. 

This week lets broaden that a bit to consider long-term consequences such as the shape of a birds beak. Various beak shapes evolved through consequences according to each species diet. Feathers started out as scales and evolved to what we see today. Feathers are not only useful for locomotion but also for thermoregulation and protection. 

This week I saw two interesting articles that involve consequences. One explaining why bird eggs have so many different shapes. What scientists found is that the shape of an egg depends on how much a bird species flies. Who knew! 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/06/22/science/bird-eggs-shapes-flight.html?emc=eta1

The second article I ran into showed house finches gathering cigarette butts to put in their nests as a pest repellent. By adding these they were not bothered by parasites. More learning due to consequences! Although the long-term consequence may not be favorable. 

https://tinyurl.com/ya52zlfo 

Enjoy!

Comment on Facebook

Wow, both very interesting information, and things I didn t know, so them for sharing. On the subject of beaks, I have experienced some long term consequences of a bad diet, previous to me (Of course 😉). I took in my male ekkie, Mylo when he was 4 years old. He turns 9 on his next gotcha day of Sept. 19th. I am still having to trim his beak every few months or so because on his first vet check, within the first couple days I had him, he had some "troubling liver numbers" so went back at the 6 month Mark and again at the 1 year and by the one year mark my vet was totally astonished. She said if she had not seen him herself that first time I brought him in she wouldn't have believed it was the same bird. Big boost for the way I care for my birds and how I was taught, but most importantly he has shown awesome liver #'s and everything else since his 6 month check. However, his beak and nails are still growing a bit fast. They have certainly slowed down over the years, I use to trim monthly and now can go anywhere from 4-6 months between trimming. So, that just goes to show #1 how damaging a bad diet can be, even only after a few years, #2 how long it truly takes to right itself within the body, as he has had good #' s for going on 4 years now but still showing a small bit of evidence of the trauma. Here's a recent picture of him preening while sitting in the window, keeping an eye on all possible dangers for the flock. Yes, he is the lookout and sounds quite the call if he sees anything he doesn't like 😘😚

Curious about what the pictured parrot is eating...

3 days ago

The Gabriel Foundation

We're so excited that nearly all of our cockatiels have been adopted! Tyler and Jackie recently adopted cockatiels Whitebird and Greybird. These two not-so-creatively-named cuties came to us about two years ago and finally found a family to love them. We wish everyone in the family all the best and many happy years together!

(Note: Whitebird and Greybird are shown here in their travel cage)
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Were so excited that nearly all of our cockatiels have been adopted!  Tyler and Jackie recently adopted cockatiels Whitebird and Greybird.  These two not-so-creatively-named cuties came to us about two years ago and finally found a family to love them.  We wish everyone in the family all the best and many happy years together!  

(Note: Whitebird and Greybird are shown here in their travel cage)

Comment on Facebook

That's great hope they will be getting a bigger cage.

So glad they have a new home! Well done! <3

Fantastic!!!!

Yay!!!

way to go TGF... 😍

I want one

wonderful news!

Yay!

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