Do You Shop Online at Amazon?

Shopping through AmazonSmile will help our flock at TGF.

What is AmazonSmile?

AmazonSmile is a website operated by Amazon that lets you enjoy the same wide selection of products, low prices, and convenient shopping features as on Amazon.com. The difference is that when you shop on AmazonSmile (smile.amazon.com), the AmazonSmile Foundation will donate 0.5% of the price of eligible purchases to The Gabriel Foundation.

How does AmazonSmile work?

When first visiting AmazonSmile, you are prompted to select a charitable organization. This selection must be made so that your eligible purchases will be donated to The Gabriel Foundation!

Simply click here to go to AmazonSmile!

Valentine's Amazon Smile promo with love birds

Welcome 2017 with Your Gift to TGF

Please remember us at this time of year, which is the most important giving season to The Gabriel Foundation. To make your End of Year gift, donate securely from our page, or go to The Gabriel Foundation page at Colorado Gives to make your gift. Start your own fundraising page for The Gabriel Foundation to share your love of birds with your friends and family with a gift that keeps on giving.

Join us in making a difference - Donate Online Now!

Emory the African Grey

Sponsor a Bird!

If you are unable to adopt, but want to help a bird in need, please consider sponsoring the care for one of our birds.

Check Us Out on Facebook

2 days ago

The Gabriel Foundation

It's finally Friday. How about a fun game to finish off the week?
1. Type in the name of your bird into Google images.
2. Copy and post the first image that comes up into a reply to this post.
3. Now everyone else will try to guess what the name of your bird is based on the picture.

This is an easy one, this bird's name is Mango.
... See MoreSee Less

Its finally Friday.  How about a fun game to finish off the week? 
1. Type in the name of your bird into Google images.
2. Copy and post the first image that comes up into a reply to this post.
3. Now everyone else will try to guess what the name of your bird is based on the picture.

This is an easy one, this birds name is Mango.

Comment on Facebook

Most of mine, I get obscure reality stars. Let's try this instead

If I use my girl's full first name I get this. Using her shortened name is way too easy.

Had so much fun with this I added my ole' man kitty. This is exactly who he's named after.

It's the perfect name given to her by TGF staff/volunteers

My girl has an odd name, that's what I got on Google lol

+ View previous comments

We know that keeping a parrot happy and entertained can often seem like a full time job, but we'd love to hear about some of the funny phrases your parrot uses to keep YOU entertained. Please feel free to share a video as well. <Cartoon by Liana Finck, published by The New Yorker April 3, 2017> ... See MoreSee Less

We know that keeping a parrot happy and entertained can often seem like a  full time job, but wed love to hear about some of the funny phrases your parrot uses to keep YOU entertained. Please feel free to share a video as well.

Comment on Facebook

I have a 27 year old amazon that spent her first 8 years in a pet shop. Her caregiver finally purchased her. She was given to me a couple of years ago when her owner had terminal cancer. She says "do you wanna buy a bird?" haha and Areeeebba. and sometimes sings a little opera. and calls for the kitty cat.

My mustached parakeet laughs when the dog gets in trouble!!! And my favorite phrase that makes me laugh is when she says 'what's your problem?' πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚πŸ˜‚

Our parakeet just started saying Hi Baby, and Look at you!

My Catalina Macaw always lets me know when he is tired and ready for bed by saying "night night, wanna go night night!". And will NOT stop until I get up and put him to bed in his house.

A friend on an Eclectus group I'm in posted that he had taken his ekkie over to his church when a kids event was happening. One of the adults walked up and asked if his parrot talked. His Ekkie answered, "Noooooo!"

My one U2 says "Bob, where is Bob-Oh, there's Bob" The other says " Kiss me Poohpot" and "Eat your breakfast, lunch or dinner" at the appropriate times. Along with many other cockatoo conversations that are consistant at our house. <3

My scarlet loves to look out our big picture window and watch for people to walk by. When he sees someone he calls, " come here, want some" people will stop walking and look all around. Then he will say it again only louder. Has made for some very interesting laughs watching the people try to find the person saying come here want some.

Rascal, our TGF scarlet macaw, picked up the "Whhhaaattttt?" from TGF aviary visits. He loves to say "What's your problem?", and probably learned it from visitorsat the zoo he lived at for 5 months..after a screaming fit (which he rarely has). The most hysterical times were during his first shower with us. He was so excited to get in, he crashed and burned jumping off my arm (he can't fly or glide). I asked, "What did you do that for?" and he replied, "I DON'T KNOW!", clear as day. Hubby heard it, too. The second was last week. He was "stranded" in the kitchen on his stand and started screaming. I told him from another room, "Rascal, if you want down, please do not scream. You need to call for me." So they reply was, "MMMMOMMMMMM". I didn't come right away, but praised him. So he repeated it. Now he knows better than to scream and instead calls me. The first week we had him, I left the house before hubby did to go volunteer at TGF. Hubby was in the shower and started hearing a blood curdling "HELP. HELLLLPPPPPP!" He ran out of the shower thinking I had fallen down the stairs (again). Nope, Rascal was just mad that I had closed him in his cage! He has nicknamed himself "Rasbird"... a combination of his "Hello Rascal, Rascal, Rascal" and "Hello Bird Bird" (bird is always a lower pitch). He answers phone rings with a special "Hello" that sort of sounds like a stalker calling you. It's a totally different tone/voice than his typical greetings. The first thing he picked up from us are kissing sounds, and hubby and I are the only ones greeted with "Hello" and then kissing sounds. He uses this as "I'm sorry", too. As in, I am so cute, I love you, I want kisses, don't be mad. He has to have bedtime kisses or he freaks out.

Whenever I change the radio station from The Grateful Dead Channel to the Symphony Channel, our 9 year old Sun Conure Boo Boo says "bad boy". My husband is to blame LOL!

We have 8 birds in our flock. When I sweep and clean, I ask at each cage "Who made this mess"? One day at Apollo's (Scarlet) cage, he replied to me "Murphy" (male Ekkie).

My amazon is a constant chatterbox. My favs are "Hi Mama Girl", "Is that good-good?", "I love you, weeeeeee!", and the camera shutter sound (I take lots of pictures of her 😁)

My Grey calls the dog over "Kate, come here" and of course she runs over expecting a piece of random food. Once there grey commands her "Get out!!" Then he laughs...

Finn asks, "Whatcha doin'?" when I'm in another room and he can hear but see me πŸ™‚ He also says, "I love you." ❀️

"I want out". My adopted Patagonian Conure says this. He uses it when he wants out of his cage or to be with me.😊

My mother's yellow naped amazon says "help lemme outta here!" when he wants some attention

Between 7:30 - 8:00 each night, she repeats "night-night" over and over until she goes into her cage. After we cover her up, she starts to laugh . . . . and it's my laugh.

Not my macaw but a African grey I met would say "where's your sister....want to take a shower?"

I can't repeat what some of them say but my favorite is a wolf whistle followed by a "sexy bird."

When I cover my Quaker's cage at bedtime, I say "good night" to her. She always replies "good morning" πŸ’œπŸ¦

Lucky my African grey says "wanna go night night"

Dusty the cockatiel says: "How Ya Doing.", "Hi Tim". Now if she only knew how to reverse her phrases to "Hi Tim, How Ya Doing".

My 2yo Catalina macaw will start calling out, "Let me out, mama. River be GOOD BIRD." This is always, always a lie and means she has a new, mischievous trick up her sleeve.

My yellow napped amazon would ask me at appropriate time "Are we ready to eat?" My cockatiel also says "Be a good watch bird when I leave the house".

My female Quaker, when she wants to be uncovered in the morning, she'll start up with: "Wake-up", "Shower" & "Coffee"!

My green-cheek has recently taught my budgie how to talk. He now says, "Step up" "peek a boo" "little birdie" and "I love you"

+ View previous comments

Avoiding a Bite

Parrots can be a wonderful addition to our families. Biting however can jeopardize even the best relationships. Most often bites are a last resort communication by a parrot which means we missed previous signals. Be observant of your parrot's body language. A parrot that may bite will likely be holding feathers tight against the face body, tightly gripping a perch with feet slightly spread apart, lowered body and head, raised feathers on the nape, beak may be slightly open and eyes pinning. Body language can vary some per individual bird and species. If warning signals are seen we should immediately back away and regroup. Pay attention to communications.

Tips of what not to do:

Don't force a step-up (an emergency is the exception)
Don't press your hand into a parrot's chest for it to step-up
Don't leave children and parrots unattended
Don't give kisses to the beak
Don't ignore body language and be aware of daily events and the present environment
Don't startle a parrot
Don't corner or crowd a parrot, always leave an escape route
Don't hand your parrot to a stranger or place on their shoulder without observing the parrot and human body language
Don't insist a bird step up if leaning away from you
Don't use aversives to have a parrot step up for you

What if a parrot grabs an item that may be harmful? Don't wrestle your parrot for the item, you may be bit. Before the situation occurs teach your bird to β€œdrop” objects on cue. It could come in handy one day.

Set your parrot and all up to succeed!
... See MoreSee Less

Avoiding a Bite

Parrots can be a wonderful addition to our families. Biting however can jeopardize even the best relationships. Most often bites are a last resort communication by a parrot which means we missed  previous signals. Be observant of  your parrots body language. A parrot that may bite will likely be holding feathers tight against the face body, tightly gripping a perch with feet slightly spread apart, lowered body and head, raised feathers on the nape, beak may be slightly open and eyes pinning. Body language can vary some per individual bird  and species.  If warning signals are seen we should immediately back away and regroup. Pay attention to communications. 

Tips of what not to do: 

Dont force a step-up (an emergency is the exception) 
Dont press your hand into a parrots chest  for it to step-up
Dont leave children and parrots unattended
Dont give kisses to the beak
Dont ignore body language and be aware of daily events and the present environment
Dont startle a parrot
Dont corner or crowd  a parrot, always leave an escape route
Dont hand your parrot to a stranger or place on their shoulder without observing the parrot and human  body language
Dont insist a bird step up if leaning away from you
Dont use aversives to have a parrot step up for you

What if a parrot grabs an item that may be  harmful?  Dont wrestle your parrot for the item, you may be bit. Before the situation occurs teach your bird to β€œdrop” objects on cue. It could come in handy one day. 

Set your parrot and all up to succeed!

Comment on Facebook

If being bitten it's likely something we are doing and missing something. Unfortunately if we miss signals from a parrot enough times it's like not listening to an individual so why would they bother to continue communicating with us. As a result there are a few parrots who stop giving signals and will go straight to biting. The more often a parrot bites the better they will likely become at doing it. For anyone being bitten it can be a good idea to reevaluate our methods, change what we are doing. Having videos of ourselves is one method to see what we might change. Another may be to contact a professional behavior consultant such as those listed at IAABC.org.

"All birds bite, it's just a matter of which end your dealing with" - sign in Birds Unlimited, Rochester NY

I get nipped on the daily. Sometimes my bird doesn't like being told she's pretty. Or I wasn't fast enough putting the treats and the feed bowl. Or it just sounded like a good idea. But they give more kisses than nips so I deal with it

I have a cockatiel that is afraid of my hands and she will bite. I have not been able to take her out of her cage and have tried to do everything I can to make her more friendly to me. She was not this way until I took her to a vet that specialized in avian care. He took her out of the travel cage like a chicken and she has been like this ever since. Does anybody have any ideas?

It's happened a couple of times, even once with my sweet Nickel, and EVERY TIME it's been my fault, something I did that I should not have done or didn't do that I should have.

My mustached bites me a lot!!!! I just say she's mean!!!! LOL I think she does it in retaliation to me petting the dog....she is a true diva and spoiled rotten!!!!!

Good advice.I've worked with and owned parrots for 32 yrs and still have been bitten. Not something you want to experience.

+ View previous comments